Join us on Feb. 18, 2022

Artificial Intelligence | Authentic Innovation

ABOUT DMS

The Dorothy M. Smith Nursing Leadership Conference has taken place every other year since 2004 and tackles the most pressing and informative topics affecting health care and nursing. The 2022 conference will take place on Feb. 18, 2022, virtually.

Registration is free to the public. 

Bring your ideas and join us for a fun day focused on unleashing your creativity to transform health care.


This conference offers up to 5.5 contact hours for RNs and ARNPs through the Office of Professional Nursing Development- University of Florida.  Questions regarding contact hours may be sent to OfficeProfDev@nursing.ufl.edu 

Office of Professional Nursing Development- University of Florida is approved with distinction as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by Montana Nurses Association, an accredited approver with distinction by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. 

DMS Sponsors

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UF Health Jax

registration

Click here to register

event information

This one-day, innovative, FREE leadership conference – presented by the University of Florida College of Nursing and Thomas M. and Irene B. Kirbo Charitable Trust – is one of the best values for nursing educators, clinicians, researchers and other health care professionals and entrepreneurs seeking the latest innovations and most pressing topics affecting health care and nursing. Join us virtually at the Dorothy M. Smith Nursing Leadership Conference as we unleash our creativity to tackle these issues.

This conference offers up to 5.5 contact hours for RNs and ARNPs through the Office of Professional Nursing Development- University of Florida.  Questions regarding contact hours may be sent to OfficeProfDev@nursing.ufl.edu 

Office of Professional Nursing Development- University of Florida is approved with distinction as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by Montana Nurses Association, an accredited approver with distinction by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. 

  • 2022 DMS Conference Agenda
  • Sessions designed to think creatively to address current issues in health care.
  • Interdisciplinary presentations, interactive small group sessions and keynote addresses focused on blending artificial intelligence and authentic innovation to support creative leadership.
  • Resources to help guide your ideas toward actionable solutions in health care.

event details

DETAILS

  • Date: Friday, Feb. 18, 2022
  • Theme: Artificial Intelligence | Authentic Innovation
  • 8:30 a.m.: Opening remarks
  • 5 p.m.: Conference concludes
  • VIRTUAL
  • Cost: FREE

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • Health care leaders
  • Nursing educators, researchers and clinicians
  • Students, faculty and researchers in health professions

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING

  • Gain insight into how to leverage interprofessional partnerships in health to achieve shared creative goals
  • Take part in interactive dialogue with health care administration, nursing professionals and educators
  • Meet with some of the nation’s most renowned nursing experts

QUESTIONS?

Contact Rachel Rivera: rrivera8@ufl.edu

agenda

Artificial Intelligence | Authentic Innovation

8:30-8:45 a.m. | Opening Remarks

8:45-10 a.m. | Opening Keynote | “Artificial Intelligence vs. Authentic Innovation, (AI)2, Point Counter-Point”

10-10:15 a.m. | Break

10:15-11:30 a.m. | Morning Breakout Sessions

  • Option #1 | UF Health Escape Room
  • Option #2 | Lego’s Maker Lab
  • Option #3 | Clinician-Led InnoVAtion
  • Option #4 | AI and clinical education & OR prep use of AI
  • Option #5 | Artificial and Authentic patient room

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | Lunch break and Trivia

1-1:15 p.m. | Break

1:15-2:30 p.m. | Afternoon Breakout Sessions

  • Option #1 | UF Health Escape Room
  • Option #2 | Lego’s Maker Lab
  • Option #3 | Clinician-Led InnoVAtion
  • Option #4 | AI and clinical education & OR prep use of AI
  • Option #5 | Artificial and Authentic patient room

2:30-2:45 p.m. | Break

2:45-4:15 p.m. | Closing Keynote | “AI to the Third Power or AI3”

4:15-4:30 p.m. | Closing Remarks

4:30-4:45 p.m. | Program Evaluation

meet our keynote speakers

Opening Keynote Speakers:

Sara L. Horton-Deutsch, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, Caritas Coach

Sara L. Horton-Deutsch, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, Caritas Coach is a Professor & Director of USF Kaiser Permanente Partnership and has led in academic and practice settings for 35 years as an advanced practice psychiatric/mental health nurse, teacher/practitioner, consultant, program director, caring science endowed chair, coach, and academic/practice partnership director. Throughout her academic and practice career, she has contributed to evidence and practice-based knowledge development to ensure safety and quality care. As a reflective leader, she focuses on being inwardly sound and other focused to influence change positively. Horton-Deutsch has co-authored a number of books on Reflective Practice, Caring Science, Caritas Coaching, and a new text on Visionary Nursing Leadership will be published in 2022. She is a Caritas Coach, HeartMath Trainer, Reiki Practitioner, and Healing Circle Facilitator. Through her professional journey, she has learned the necessity of connecting to one’s own inner sources of wisdom, power, and healing, as well as the arts and humanities that once defined the discipline of nursing. She is passionate about facilitating critical, deep, and authentic connections that support resilience and the profession’s evolution.

JC

Jane M Carrington, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAMIA is the College of Nursing’s Dorothy M. Smith Endowed Chair and director of the Florida Blue Center for Health Care Quality. She has taught informatics courses at the Masters and PhD levels. Carrington has also taught Evidence-Based Practice for DNP students. The focus of her research is nurse-to-nurse communication of a clinical event or change in patient condition using the electronic health record. Carrington uses techniques in qualitative research and natural language processing to analyze nurse-to-nurse communication and decision-making associated with a clinical event. Carrington has been a long-time active member of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) and Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She is also a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and serves on the Information Technology Expert Panel. She has also serves on national committees for issues related to informatics, informatics education and standards.

Closing Keynote Speaker:

MB

Malaz A. Boustani, MD is the Richard M. Fairbanks Professor of Aging Research at Indiana University’s School Of Medicine. Boustani is a geriatrician, neuroscientist, and implementation scientist with a goal of using insights from behavioral economics, complexity science, and network science to develop, implement and distribute an innovative, sustainable and scalable “Blue Print” of the 21st Century learning Academic healthcare delivery system. Such an agile social organization will be able to reduce the 17-year cycle of developing and translating innovative, cost effective, and scalable medical innovations. At the same time, the learning system will be capable of delivering personalized, evidence-based, and valued healthcare with a great experience for clinicians, learners, and patients.

Dorothy m. smith


Dorothy M. Smith was born in 1913 in Bangor, Maine and went on to receive her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Teachers College in Columbia University and Harvard University.

In 1956, under a ramshackle Quonset Hut on the University of Florida campus, Smith and her colleagues developed a dream which became the philosophy of the UF College of Nursing—one of the first two colleges at UF’s brand new J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center. As founding Dean, Smith dreamt of a new form of nursing education—a school where knowledge-based clinical excellence was the norm for administrators, faculty members, staff nurses and students alike. Smith was one of the early nursing leaders to fully integrate nursing education, practice and research, which laid the groundwork for advanced nursing practice and the shift in nursing research to clinical effectiveness and outcomes.
She developed the UF baccalaureate program in nursing and brought national recognition to the program through the introduction of many important and bold nursing innovations, often contrary to established practice and therefore, highly controversial.
She believed that those who teach nursing should be directly involved in it, and while Dean of the College, she also served as chief of nursing practice at Shands Hospital.
“I have always thought that the heart of nursing is the primary relationship with the patient,” Smith said.  “I find that the challenge of giving care to patients is intellectually stimulating as well as emotionally satisfying.”

A significant nurse leader of her time, Dorothy Smith was influential in changing the way nursing was taught and practiced. Her work moved nursing into the mainstream of higher education, unified nursing education and practice, and led to the development of evidence-based nursing practice.

Smith was a leader in launching a huge effort focused on nursing assessment and worked to develop a new technology known as the clinical assessment database. Her hope was to build a body of knowledge for nursing care that was distinct from the medical database, and would instead focus on patient care and provide a basis for clinical research.

“To me the distinguishing characteristic of professional nursing is clinical thinking,” Smith said. “Every patient, whether well, getting sick, being sick or getting well has the right to a nurse who by virtue of this clinical thinking, manages the nursing care and is accountable for that care.”

A pioneer and visionary in the nursing field, Smith influenced nursing education’s renewed commitment to and influence in clinical nursing—a commitment that laid the foundation for many of the most important nursing advances over the past few decades.

“In my career, I would say that I am most proud of those patients I’ve cared for, the students who I have helped and the technology that I have helped to create to improve nursing care,” Smith said. “I always felt it was better to tell people what was possible rather than say something wasn’t possible.”